‘November 22, 1963’

Will we ever know the truth about the Kennedy assassination? In a film by Errol Morris, Josiah “Tink” Thompson returns to what has haunted him for 50 years: Frame #313 of the Zapruder film.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/21/opinion/morris-november-22-1963.html?hp&rref=opinion&_r=2&

The Umbrella Man: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/22/opinion/the-umbrella-man.html?ref=opinion

pixelfucks:

GALLOP

pixelfucks:

GALLOP

Pinterest to pay Getty Images for data on images

"Their collection not only includes great images but also data about each image," Pinterest product manager Michael Yamartino wrote in a blog post. "This can include who took the image, when, where, and what’s in the picture. We think this will be really valuable, especially when pin descriptions and links are not as helpful as we’d hope."

omggifpop:

Muybridge’s Horse vs. Boston Dynamics’ WildCat
How lovely is this comparison? Boston Dynamics’ robot is wild for sure.

omggifpop:

Muybridge’s Horse vs. Boston Dynamics’ WildCat

How lovely is this comparison? Boston Dynamics’ robot is wild for sure.

explore-blog:


Imagine the writer as a meme machine, writing works with the intention for them to ripple rapidly across networks only to evaporate just as quickly as they appeared. Imagine a poetry that is vast, instantaneous, horizontal, globally distributed, paper thin, and, ultimately, disposable.

Kenneth Goldsmith, author of the fantastic Uncreative Writing, considers the evolving role of the writer as a meme machine. Pair with the surprising origin of “meme.”

explore-blog:

Imagine the writer as a meme machine, writing works with the intention for them to ripple rapidly across networks only to evaporate just as quickly as they appeared. Imagine a poetry that is vast, instantaneous, horizontal, globally distributed, paper thin, and, ultimately, disposable.

Kenneth Goldsmith, author of the fantastic Uncreative Writing, considers the evolving role of the writer as a meme machine. Pair with the surprising origin of “meme.”

new-aesthetic:

Inside an Amazon Warehouse

Amazon must rely on barcodes and human hands to find the ordered items and drop them into the proper bins — without robots, Amazon utilizes a system known as “chaotic storage,” where products are essentially shelved at random. 

By storing items randomly instead of categorically, the warehouse has a much better flow of material. Even without robots or automation, Amazon can compile a “picking list” that locates where each item needs to be taken off the shelf and scanned again before it can be shipped.

The real advantage to chaotic storage is that it’s significantly more flexible than conventional storage systems. If there are big changes in a product range, the company doesn’t need to plan for more space, because the products or their sales volumes don’t need to be known or planned in advance if they’re simply being stored at random.

Furthermore, free space is much better utilized in a chaotic storage system. In a conventional system, free space may go unused for quite a while simply because stock is low or there aren’t enough products to begin with. Without any kind of fixed positions, available shelf space is always being used.