Facial-recognition tech played no role in ID’ing bomb suspects
Despite images of the suspects at the scene and in official databases, the software could not put names to their faces, Boston’s police commissioner tells the Washington Post.(cnet)
It Wasn’t Sunil Tripathi: The Anatomy of a Misinformation Disaster
How a terrible misidentification of two people with no connection to the Boston bombing spread so far, so fast. (The Atlantic)
Foreign Policy on CNN’s Bad Boston Coverage and Gresham’s Law: “Bad money drives out good.”“The law makes a simple but powerful point: Why would you go to the trouble of obtaining genuine legal tender when, at a lower cost, you can get something that works just as well? Joseph Schumpeter may have explained the law best in his History of Economic Analysis, pointing out that “if coins containing metal of different value enjoy equal legal-tender power, then the ‘cheapest’ ones will be used for payment, the better ones will tend to disappear from circulation. The same is true for the news. If bad news — in the sense of the quality of the news, not its content — is just as valuable as good news, then good news will eventually disappear from the market.”

Facial-recognition tech played no role in ID’ing bomb suspects

Despite images of the suspects at the scene and in official databases, the software could not put names to their faces, Boston’s police commissioner tells the Washington Post.(cnet)

It Wasn’t Sunil Tripathi: The Anatomy of a Misinformation Disaster

How a terrible misidentification of two people with no connection to the Boston bombing spread so far, so fast. (The Atlantic)

Foreign Policy on CNN’s Bad Boston Coverage and Gresham’s Law: “Bad money drives out good.”

“The law makes a simple but powerful point: Why would you go to the trouble of obtaining genuine legal tender when, at a lower cost, you can get something that works just as well? Joseph Schumpeter may have explained the law best in his History of Economic Analysispointing out that “if coins containing metal of different value enjoy equal legal-tender power, then the ‘cheapest’ ones will be used for payment, the better ones will tend to disappear from circulation. The same is true for the news. If bad news — in the sense of the quality of the news, not its content — is just as valuable as good news, then good news will eventually disappear from the market.
Privacy concerns grow over FBI data gathering
"Rick Nelson, the director of the homeland security and counterterrorism program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, views NGI as essential. While he welcomes the technology, Nelson is skeptical of the legal framework surrounding it. “Ensuring that we have the oversight structures in place, policies and laws in place … so it’s done in a manner that’s acceptable to the American people — that’s where we’re lagging behind,” Nelson says. “It’s difficult to take the position that we’re somehow going to stop … the proliferation of private and public entities, having access to our personal information, including things like facial recognition and fingerprints,” Nelson adds. “It’s changing society. That dynamic isn’t going to change.”

Privacy concerns grow over FBI data gathering

"Rick Nelson, the director of the homeland security and counterterrorism program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, views NGI as essential. While he welcomes the technology, Nelson is skeptical of the legal framework surrounding it. “Ensuring that we have the oversight structures in place, policies and laws in place … so it’s done in a manner that’s acceptable to the American people — that’s where we’re lagging behind,” Nelson says. “It’s difficult to take the position that we’re somehow going to stop … the proliferation of private and public entities, having access to our personal information, including things like facial recognition and fingerprints,” Nelson adds. “It’s changing society. That dynamic isn’t going to change.”

Computer scientists have published a paper detailing how two algorithms could be used in conjunction with thermal imaging to scan for inebriated people in public places.

In the paper, published in the International Journal of Electronic Security and Digital Forensics, Georgia Koukiou and Vassilis Anastassopoulos of the University of Patras in Greece detail two different algorithms they are working on that focus on data gathered from a subject’s face — alcohol causes blood-vessel dilation at the skin’s surface, so by using this principle as a starting point the two began to compare data gathered from thermal-imaging scans. One algorithm compares a database of these facial scans of drunk and sober individuals against pixel values from different sites on a subject’s face. A similar method has been used in the past to detect infections, such as SARS, at airports — though a study carried out at the time of the 2003 outbreak warned, “although the use of infrared instruments to measure body surface temperatures has many advantages, there are human, environmental, and equipment variables that can affect the accuracy of collected data.”

REKOGNIZE YOUR OWN FACE
@ rekognition

REKOGNIZE YOUR OWN FACE

@ rekognition

"A Californian university has won funding to use advanced facial recognition technology to try to solve the mysteries of some of the world’s most famous works of art." 
"The idea for the experiment came from watching news and detective shows such as CSI which had a constant theme of using advanced computers to recognise unknown faces from murder victims to wanted criminals.” 
“"It is different using this on art rather than an actual human," said Rudolph, "But we are trying to test the limits of the technology now and then who knows what advances may happen in the future? This is a fast-moving field." (Guardian)

"A Californian university has won funding to use advanced facial recognition technology to try to solve the mysteries of some of the world’s most famous works of art." 

"The idea for the experiment came from watching news and detective shows such as CSI which had a constant theme of using advanced computers to recognise unknown faces from murder victims to wanted criminals.”

"It is different using this on art rather than an actual human," said Rudolph, "But we are trying to test the limits of the technology now and then who knows what advances may happen in the future? This is a fast-moving field." (Guardian)

A WEST Australian researcher is among the first to introduce cameras previously only used in satellites to face recognition technology, with the aim of increasing the amount of information obtained from images and the accuracy of identification.

Prof Mian says cameras taken from satellites have the capacity to go beyond the simple RGB colours and sample light at hundreds of wavelengths including the infra-red.

“The more samples we take, the more information we can get. More information helps to identify faces more accurately,” he says.

nose recognition

 ”Common wisdom has it that humans recognize the face “holistically,” meaning that there is something about the picture created by the entire face – the particular arrangement of a face’s eyes, nose, and mouth and not just these features themselves – that makes it easier for the human brain to make a positive ID.” New research says it might not be that easy!

MACHINE PAREIDOLIA

MACHINE PAREIDOLIA

new-aesthetic:

“How do robots see the world? How do they gather meaning from our streets, cities, media and from us? This is an experiment in found machine-vision footage, exploring the aesthetics of the robot eye.”

Timo is the New Aesthetic.

“Eyes, lips and hands have been overdone in art history,” Baldessari says, “so I thought ears and noses, why not?” 

(Source: eklektx.com)

with transcript

Munch sett med nye øyne, miniseminar på Nasjonalmuseet. 

Munch sett med nye øyne, miniseminar på Nasjonalmuseet.